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THE 2016 HOT DOG CAPER IS NOW OVER
THANK YOU TO ALL OUR VOLUNTEERS AND SPONSORS

 

EVENT PHOTOS 2016


2016 EVENT PHOTOS

PHOTOBOOTH PHOTOS #1

PHOTOBOOTH PHOTOS #2

 

VIDEO





 

2016 Tropical-themed Hot Dog Caper

 

At the beginning of every fall quarter, Cal Poly Pomona Foundation and campus partners welcome the university community back to campus with the annual Hot Dog Caper. All students, faculty and staff are invited to enjoy free hot dogs, chips, popsicles, drinks and entertainment.


 

Polynesian Paradise Dancers

For the 2016 Hot Dog Caper, we are honored to have the Polynesian Paradise Dancers share their culture with the Cal Poly Pomona campus community.

 

The Polynesian Paradise Dancers specialize in the traditional dances and music of the Polynesian Islands. The company has shared the culture with audiences from all over the world; they have visited 31 states, and had 10 international tours including Abu Dhabi, China, Japan, Guam and the Marshall Islands.

 

Polynesian dance encompasses Tahitian, Tongan, Samoan, Fijian, Maori (New Zealand) and Hawaiian styles. It began as an accompaniment to the oral storytelling traditions of those islands, conveying the literal meaning of a tale.

 

For more information about Polynesian dance, visit: https://goo.gl/t0BJzA

 

 

The Meaning of Leis

 

According to the Polynesian Cultural Center in Hawaii, “a Lei is an expression of many things including love, gratitude, sympathy, happiness, [and] recognition. It is given to anyone you want, both the elderly and the young.

 

Flower Leis are more popular and welcome, but we make Leis from many other things such as candy, money, small toys for children … use your imagination.”

 

This YouTube video teaches the history of the Lei.

 

To learn more about the Polynesian Cultural Center, visit: http://www.polynesia.com/.

 

 


 

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